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Seasonality in Epileptic Seizures

vitaminddisc

As you may or may not know, I have been fighting with my Epilepsy team to prove that there is a correlation between Vitamin D deficiency and seasonality in Epileptic seizures. Zsófia Clemens,, András Holló , Anna Kelemen , György Rásonyi , Dániel Fabó , Péter Halász, József Janszky, and Anna Szűcs in their 2013 study, reported a significant effect seasonal effect (p=0.026), which I presented to my Epilepsy team. In the study, patients kept a seizure diary and seizure numbers showed a significant seasonal pattern for Epileptic seizures with a peak in January and a nadir in August – very similar to my own. In fact, the highest numbers were during the three winter months – again similar to my own.

 

There also appears to be more direct evidence supporting the anti-convulsive effect of vitamin D. In fact, according to their pilot study in 2012, they reveal that vitamin D deficiency is known to be highly prevalent among epilepsy patients, which appears to be unknown to NHS England, as it appears to be unknown to my Epilepsy team.

In a comparison during a 90-day period before and after vitamin D3 treatment onset, median seizure reduction was 40%. Furthermore, reduction of seizure numbers was significant (p = 0.04). The conclusion of the study therefore, was that vitamin D has an anticonvulsant effect in support with antiepileptic drugs.

 

This study appears to suggest that NHS England is failing its Epilepsy patients. My Epilepsy team also told me that vitamin D deficiency does not cause seizures, however this pilot study appears to suggest otherwise. Therefore, if vitamin D was prescribed alongside anticonvulsant medication, imagine the significant impact this might have for the wellbeing of Epilepsy patients’ health in the UK?

 

What is also important to note is the final discussion:

 

“Our study highlights the potential importance of screening vitamin D levels in patients on antiepileptic therapy and starting supplementation in those with low levels.”

 

What does this this mean for Black people with Epilepsy?

 

As a Black woman with Epilepsy, my priority is always speaking out against racism in Epilepsy. The NHS guidelines state that 30 minutes of sunlight a day is sufficient for vitamin D intake – implicitly ignoring people of colour and those of us who may be chronically ill, or in bed recovering from seizures on a regular basis. Low vitamin D levels also cause fatigue, depression and weight gain – things that many women of colour in particular complain of, and white Clinicians stigmatise them for.

According to the Mental Health Foundation, people with a long-term illness or disease are at greater risk of a range of mental health problems such as depression, anxiety and PTSD (Mental Health Foundation, 2018). However, due to racism from white Clinicians, people of colour are rarely offered help such as counselling and talking therapies in comparison to their white counterparts. Depression is also a symptom of Epilepsy while simultaneously a side-effect of many anticonvulsants, therefore the negative implications of low levels of vitamin D will have a significant effect upon mood and quality of life for people of colour with Epilepsy.

What about outside of the doctor’s room? Well, all of this will have severe implications on the standard of living for people of colour: socioeconomically, Epilepsy affects level of wealth and job prospects, because employers are much less sympathetic towards us. We are seen as fakers when we are sick and aggressive when we try to stand up for ourselves.  In fact, we are seen as aggressive whether or not we are sick. This then affects our economic and political stability, as well as our safety in terms of which geographic locations we can reside in, which again circles back to mental health, freedom and quality of life.

So when people continue to ask, what does Epilepsy have to do with race? Everything.

And finally, my blood test result was 25 (the lowest is 24), which is severely low, proving that vitamin D should be prescribed to Black Epilepsy patients on the NHS, along with anticonvulsants. However, once my prescription of two-weeks’ worth of boosters has been taken, I will be left to self-medicate for vitamin D and add oily fish to my shopping trolley, in order to maintain my own seizure and mental health control, instead of relying upon NHS England to do that for me. Or at least help me with it.

 

References

Holló, A., Clemens, Z., Kamondi, A., Lakatos, P., & Szűcs, A. (2012). Correction of vitamin D deficiency improves seizure control in epilepsy: A pilot study. Epilepsy & Behavior, 24(1), 131-133. doi:10.1016/j.yebeh.2012.03.011

 

Zsófia Clemens, András Holló , Anna Kelemen, György Rásonyi, Dániel Fabó, Péter Halász, József Janszky, & Anna Szűcs1. (2013). Seasonality in Epileptic Seizures. Journal of Neurology and Translational Neuroscience. 1: 1016.

 

Mental Health Foundation. Mental Health Statistics: Physical Health Conditions

 

The Guardian. ‘The Lowest of the Stack’: Why Black Women Are Struggling With Mental Health

Author:

I’m Cece Alexandra and I have Epilepsy. Since being diagnosed, my life has changed significantly. After studying and teaching Humanities and Literature for all of my adult life, I was bullied and lost my job a month before qualifying to become an English Teacher. Once you fail the Teacher Training course in England, you cannot ever retrain; I then became too sick to work because of my Epilepsy. I am now currently studying an MSc in Mental Health Psychology with the University of Liverpool. My disability provokes me into raising awareness for invisible disabilities, which I also actively partake in with Epilepsy Action. Part of that awareness is to help fight against invisible disability discrimination - I believe that this behaviour is not cognitively unconscious; modern society is actively partaking in a hierarchy of disabilities and I believe that there is not enough psychological research to prove this. I am also clinically interested in Cultural Psychology - particularly Collectivist Culture, and wish to pursue this further in my academic career.

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