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Winston Churchill – The Murderer

“England celebrates their genocides. The ‘Winston Churchill note’ has entered circulation. Honouring a man who swilled on champagne while 4 million men, women and children in Bengal starved due to his racist colonial policies.”

Thank goodness for contactless payments, because the thought of holding a £5 note now makes me want to vomit. I’ve worshipped a murderer for twenty years; you fuckers taught us in school that he was a hero and when I was a teacher I taught the same. 

You even taught us that he was “one of us“, before my eyes were opened.

Churchill was born on 30 November 1874 in Blenheim Palace. What endeared me to him was his speech impediment, which he overcame. He was also a sickly child. He was a successful journalist and author of bestsellers, and before World War I he had already served as home secretary, president of the board of trade and first lord of the admiralty (head of the navy). During World War I, he was appointed minister of munitions, then secretary of state for war and secretary of state for air. After the war, he became secretary of state for the colonies and, finally, served as chancellor of the Exchequer from 1924 to 1929.

During the build up towards World War II, Churchill was an isolated hero, valiant enough to take on Hitler; in school we were taught that Chamberlain was the cowardly “Appeaser”, frightened of the Third Reich and it was Churchill who saved Europe from complete Nazi control. 
Churchill addressed the people directly only a few times, but when he did, up to two-thirds of Britons sat in front of their radios, hanging on his every word. I still remember the shivers I used to get whenever I used to listen to the “We shall fight on the beaches” speech from 4 June 1940. Churchill’s strongest weapon was the word. The equally eloquent John F. Kennedy, son of the then US ambassador in London and later president of the United States, once said that Churchill had sent the English language to war, and this is how he connected with his people, and what made his MY hero. He gave magnificent speeches, and even the Nazis were impressed by his eloquence. “In his crudeness, he does command a certain amount of respect,” Joseph Goebbels (1897-1945) wrote. Churchill emphasized a total commitment to the war. While the Third Reich exploited forced laborers and ransacked the countries it occupied, the Britons were expected to contribute directly to the war effort by these rhetorical performances. Churchill convinced them that without their efforts at home, the War could not be won on the Front.

He did all of this through his words.

So imagine my dismay when I discovered that not only were Churchill’s speeches plagiarised, (a similar passage to “We Shall Fight” appears in Rudyard Kipling’s collection of stories: “The Jungle Book”); Britain greatest hero is a mass murderer. 

At the Palestine Royal Commission (Peel) of 1937, Churchill stated that he believed in intention of the Balfour Declaration was to make Palestine an “overwhelmingly Jewish state”. He went on to also express to the Peel Commission that he does “not admit for instance, that a great wrong has been done to the Red Indians of America or the black people of Australia. I do not admit that a wrong has been done to these people by the fact that a stronger race, a higher-grade race, a more worldly wise race to put it that way, has come in and taken their place”.

Churchill was the archetypical white supremacist, and this is why racism still exists in Britain because we’ve been teaching it in our school for years. Like a fool I’ve been teaching it! Churchill didn’t want to stop Hitler, he was just lusting for non-white blood.

During the Second World War, Churchill decided to torture India; he wanted to start a civil war because he despised them as a people, he despised their religion, and he wanted to make money:

Bengal-Famine

(Image Source)

The British Army took millions of tons of rice from starving people to ship to the Middle East – where it wasn’t even needed. When the starving people of Bengal asked for food, Churchill said the ‘famine’ was their own fault “for breeding like rabbits”. The Viceroy of India said: “Churchill’s attitude towards India and the famine is negligent, hostile and contemptuous”. Even right wing imperialist Leo Amery who was the British Secretary of State in India said he: “didn’t see much difference between his [Churchill] outlook and Hitler’s”.

Neither do I, because his blood-lust didn’t just stop at India either. My Grandfather was Indian. Were his parents back in India during the 1940s? Did they suffer during that famine? Were they victims of Churchill? I have no way of knowing. The thought makes me sick to my stomach. The very thought that I possibly celebrated their torturer tears me apart.

Two weeks ago, my partner and I went to Windsor castle and saw a room of spoils the Empire had “acquired”, including this one:

Indian Crown

I’m sorry, did I say acquired? I meant stolen. Yes this was before Churchill was born, however this photograph – as well as the entire castle really was a reminder of the damage Britain has done to non-White people all over the world.

British Colonialism has played a huge part in shaping today’s society. It has facilitated Britain’s economic expansion by ensuring its control over distant territories and peoples, in a large-scale domination scheme that required and promoted huge disparities in power and the subjugation of innocent populations. The British and Europeans used “tests of intelligence”, falsely proving the people of Africa to be less able intellectually, to control of their resources and justified it as the “natural outcome” – this is also how they justified land seizures and slave-trading for profit. 

Although most colonies gained independence after the Second World War, the contemporary flow of goods, capital, people and culture in many countries still retains the colonial pattern. Colonialism requires strong social and psychological mechanisms of domination and control, which have become more pervasive and subtle over time (Moane, 1999), which we now refer to as racial microaggressions.

Yet for our past – particularly our Caribbean island – we’ve received no apologies and no reparations from Britain, for the racist crimes of theft, rape, torture, and severe damage to our mental health.

I’ll leave you with this as food for thought from your hero, Winston Churchill, who died on 24 January 1965 in Kensington, London:

“Churchill suggested the motto “Keep England White” when debating the adoption of new laws limiting immigration from the Caribbean.”

I’m jubilant to finally know the truth now. I’ve spent many months searching for the truth about Churchill, and I’m finally liberated. I just wish that Britain would be honest with its history, because as a society you are concealing some densely racist skeletons.

 

Written by a Black-Caribbean blogger, born in Britain, with family from St Lucia, Caribbean, India and France.

All quotes from https://crimesofbritain.com/2016/09/13/the-trial-of-winston-churchill/ 

Author:

My body remains on the sidelines watching, while my mind roams around the room, taking in the world around her. I am a wallflower. There could be two reasons for this: It could be due to me being an introvert or just that I am a Cancerian! I’m Cece Alexandra and I am so honoured that you’ve been led to delve into my thoughts here in this blog! I would describe myself as a Wallflower which is why I use words to express my deepest – and sometimes darkest - thoughts. Words have always been my strongest method of expressing myself. Growing up I always wanted to be a writer, however life and circumstances chipped away at my confidence until there was nothing left. Without words, I could no longer express myself. I am also Epileptic. Since being diagnosed, I have realised that my deepest fear is the day I am finally on my deathbed, haunted by the overwhelming regret that I never achieved my God-given potential. This realisation forced me to take a step of faith and put myself out there. Yes it makes me vulnerable, however within the process I not only want to be an inspiration to myself; I want to be an inspiration to other women – to be whatever you want to be. Embrace the fear and doubt and utilise that as the fuel you need to push through! Life is for living to the fullest. Life is for loving, for living true to yourself and to the people around you. Life however, can also be crippling, dark and overwhelming. But you are not alone. This thought alone is what will help you get up from the ground.

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