Posted in Blog

Social Media: Let’s Get Personal

This is going to be a VERY angry post. After my last post on mental health, I had some negative feedback on my personal Facebook page from somebody I know. We came to blows and after her comments, I had to block her.

 

People were comfortable when I was only sharing posts of me smiling, because that’s what social media’s about right?

 

Putting on a show for one another’s amusement.

 

We tell each other what we had for breakfast; we post pictures of our cute little dogs; we check in on our trips to Ikea (I actually did that yesterday haha), and the sad posts are okay as long as they’re temporary. People don’t care about our pain if it doesn’t have a sell-by-date, and I’m sorry but that’s the truth.

 

Since I’ve become sick, lost my job and become more outspoken about race, more and more people on my personal Facebook page have criticised me for “moaning” on their newsfeeds. This is regardless of balance too – I’ve shared the positive and the negative. 

 

How dare you tell me what to share about my life?

How dare you tell me what to post on my own Facebook page?

I have to scroll past your trash whenever I log onto Facebook, while I’m lying in bed crippled after a seizure or depression. Or both.

And by the way, thanks for fucking asking if I’m okay.

If you don’t like what I’m saying, scroll the fuck on bitch.

Eye Roll

Talking to a close friend about this, and taking her advice, I had to come to the decision that I’ll no longer to posting my blog to my personal Facebook page. And that’s tragic, because it appears that I’m now writing to the world and not my home. However, it protects my mental health, and it reduces stress, which will hopefully reduce seizures (by the way, my Zonisamide has been increased, I’m not fucking happy. 500mg, on top of the Keppra, AND anti-depressants???? For fuck’s sake. But of course, people on Facebook are sooooooooooooooooooooooo tired of hearing me moan about my fucking epilepsy because it hasn’t gone away yet).

Every day shows me who my enemies are; I already know who cares, I need to focus on that.

Furthermore, haters is a sure sign of success – I’m pretty sure that somebody somewhere successful said that.

You Got It Dude

Thanks for reading guys, and I also want to take this time to thank you for your support.

XOXO

Author:

I’m Cece Alexandra and I have Epilepsy. Since being diagnosed, my life has changed significantly. After studying and teaching Humanities and Literature for all of my adult life, I was bullied and lost my job a month before qualifying to become an English Teacher. Once you fail the Teacher Training course in England, you cannot ever retrain; I then became too sick to work because of my Epilepsy. I am now currently studying an MSc in Mental Health Psychology with the University of Liverpool. My disability provokes me into raising awareness for invisible disabilities, which I also actively partake in with Epilepsy Action. Part of that awareness is to help fight against invisible disability discrimination - I believe that this behaviour is not cognitively unconscious; modern society is actively partaking in a hierarchy of disabilities and I believe that there is not enough psychological research to prove this. I am also clinically interested in Cultural Psychology - particularly Collectivist Culture, and wish to pursue this further in my academic career.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s